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Sugarcane are very proud to have designed and developed the website for Neuroblastoma UK.

The Neuroblastoma UK website is dedicated to creating awareness for this particular disease. As well as creating awareness, the website also provides information and support for families affected by the disease. But most importantly the website is a portal for raising funds to help find a cure.

You may have become a lot more aware about Neuroblastoma by following the storyline currently airing on ITV’s Coronation Street. It is an aggressive form of childhood cancer that is generally not as well known as other forms of cancer, but Neuroblastoma UK are looking to change this perception.

The TV show is featuring a storyline where a little girl has contracted the disease, which is great for raising awareness for Neuroblastoma. The website has used this opportunity as well to create more awareness, which will benefit the society greatly and hopefully raise more funds for essential research.

Neuroblastoma website 2

So what is Neuroblastoma?

Neuroblastoma is a tumour arising from particular nerve cells, which run in a chain-like fashion up the back of the child’s abdomen and chest and into the skull following the line of the spinal cord (neuro = nerve, blastoma = collection of tumour cells). The tumour occurs either in the sympathetic nervous system or closely associated adrenal glands and is usually, although not always, located in the abdomen.

Who is affected?

Neuroblastoma affects around 100 children each year in the UK. It usually affects children under the age of five, and can occur before a child is born. It is the most common solid tumour in childhood after brain tumours.

What are the symptoms?

Many children have little in the way of symptoms and it is often hard to diagnose neuroblastoma in the early stages.   Perhaps they have seemed ‘off-colour’ for a little while: initial symptoms are common ones – for example, aches and pains, loss of appetite or sweating.

However, the most common symptom when the cancer has developed is a lump or swelling in the child’s abdomen, as this is where the cancer usually starts. It can cause constipation and general discomfort and pain.

The site of the tumour may cause different symptoms. For example, a tumour right at the back of the abdomen, which has grown to press on the spinal cord, may cause a variety of symptoms including an unsteady walk or difficulty passing urine. A child who has a tumour in the chest may have an initial problem with a chest infection, cough or fluid in the lung, which may need treatment before the neuroblastoma itself is tackled.

Other possible symptoms are:

  • a lump in the child’s neck, which can make them breathless or cause difficulty swallowing
  • bone pain and difficulty walking, if the cancer has affected their bones
  • numbness, weakness or loss of movement in the child’s lower body, if the cancer has affected their spinal cord
  • anaemia, bruising, bleeding and infections, if the cancer has affected their bone marrow
  • bluish lumps in their skin, if the cancer has spread to the skin

If you want to find out more information about neuroblastoma or if you want to donate please visit www.neuroblastoma.org.uk

Sugarcane continue to support neuroblastoma UK with ongoing website maintenance. Providing updates to the website whenever the society needs them.

 

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